Job in Australia

About Salaries in Australia

August 2014

Every job listed on seek.com.au is required to specify a minimum and maximum salary range.
In addition, SEEK has compiled these charts to give an idea of the salary range in the particular industry individuals are searching in.
Take a look at our findings below to see if you are reaching your pay potential.

Note: All SEEK job ads are required to provide a min/max salary range. The values above are based on the average min/max salary data provided in SEEK ads and are updated monthly.

Average Salary Mid Point by Classification ($AUD)

Skilled Occupations List (SOL)

You must nominate an occupation from the Skilled Occupations List (SOL) if you are applying for an Independent or Family Sponsored Points Tested visa or Temporary Graduate (subclass 485) – Graduate Work Stream.

Applicants who require a skills assessment as part of their visa application must contact a relevant assessing authority directly to obtain a skill assessment. The assessing authority will provide all necessary applications forms and associated information relating to the assessment.

There will be a charge by the assessing authorities for the assessment.

Consolidated Sponsored Occupations List

You must nominate an occupation from the Consolidated Sponsored Occupations List (CSOL) if you are nominated by a State or Territory Government, a direct entry stream Employer Nomination Scheme visa, a Temporary Work (Skilled) visa (subclass 457) or a Training and Research Visa (Subclass 402).

Applicants who require a skills assessment as part of their visa application must contact a relevant assessing authority directly to obtain a skills assessment. The assessing authority will provide all necessary applications forms and associated information relating to the assessment.

There will be a charge by the assessing authorities for the assessment.

Australian Job Market Holding Its Own

In terms of jobs growth, Australia is performing about the average of other developed countries, such as Japan and Germany, with just under 1 per cent expansion, and we are doing better than the US, which has only 0.6 per cent growth. Iceland and Ireland are the leaders, growing jobs at more than 3 per cent, but they are coming from a much lower base. In the UK, jobs are growing again, up 1.5 per cent in 2014. According to Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) figures, jobs in Greece and Spain are still in free-fall, particularly for younger people.

How do Australians’ rates of pay compare with those of workers of other nations? Actually, we are paid comparatively well. When wages are compared and adjusted for exchange rates, Australia comes near the top of the league table, earning an average of $US77,000 ($83,350) a year. The Swiss are the best paid at $US90,000. Surprisingly, we have average higher rates of pay than the US at $US55,000, the Germans at $US45,000. and Britain at $US51,000. Australians have a much higher rate of pay than Koreans at $US29,000 and about 10 times the Chinese average pay of $US7500. The low rates of pay in China mean it is much cheaper to manufacture goods there compared with manufacturing in Australia and the US.

Yet, are Australians the hard workers we think we are? Well, according to the International Labour Organisation, Australian workers are at the bottom end of hours worked per week; we work on average 34 hours a worker, just less than the Brits, who average 35.8, but slightly more than the Kiwis, who work on average 33.6 hours a week. The hardest workers are those in Qatar (50 hours a week) and Saudi Arabia (49.9 hours a week). The Chinese also work much harder than Australians at 46.2 hours a week.
In terms of overall unemployment, Australia ranks well and is at the lower end when compared with other nations. Australia’s rate of unemployment is just 6 per cent, lower than the OECD average of 7.5 per cent. Italy has an unemployment rate of 12.7 per cent, Ireland 11.8 per cent and Spain 25.3 per cent.

And the overall picture for Australia? Our job market is faring quite well on the international stage, we don’t work too hard and we are comparatively well paid. Unemployment is quite low, and although youth unemployment is an issue, it is much worse in many other countries. So, are we still the lucky country after all?

Sourced from www.smh.com.au

Australian Settlement Survey Evaluation

Have you obtained a job in Australia?

Yes

89.5%

No

10.5%
How did you come to know your job?

Direct application to employer

32.48%

Online recruitment agencies

30.43%

Recommendation

26.09%

Visit a recruitment agency

11.00%
Key challenges in obtaining a job in Australia

No Australia working experience

60%

No interview calls

34.28%

Wages low

2.86%

Job out of field

2.86%
Waiting period to obtain a job in Australia

1-3 months

44.62%

4-6 months

24.77%

< 1 month

15.38%

> 6 month

15.23%

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